There’s more to Mahi-Mahi

mahi
Mahi is one of the most popular fish we see this time of year. It has a the right balance of moist, sweet, and firm meat that makes it great on the grill for a summer BBQ. It is also a classic fish for use in fish tacos.

Another thing we like to do at Locals Seafood is share interesting facts about the species caught by North Carolina fishermen. Every fish has its own story that can help build and even deeper connection with the food we eat. Here are a few notes about Mahi you can share with friends and family over the grill or in the kitchen this weekend:

Mahi goes by many names around the world. Its original name is Dolphinfish but is now marketed under the Hawaiian name Mahi Mahi so no one would confuse it with the mammal. In our neck of the woods you can shorten it to one “Mahi” and everyone knows what you are talking about. Another common name is Dorado, in Spanish, that you may have seen on the menu in Central America or the Carribean. Check out a full list of names from around the world here: FAO Species Sheet on Dolphinfish

Searching for recipes using another name for a fish is a great way to discover something new. For example, in Malta Mahi is called “Lampuki”. They have a traditional fish pie that may be a fun thing to try. Traditional Lampuki Pie.

Mahi is a fast and well traveled fish. They can reach speeds over 50 mph. Tagged fish have been found to travel a minimum of 1,200 miles, and some circling the Atlantic for up to 4,000 miles! They are currently on their migration North up our coast. Read more detail about the Dolphinfish tagging program with South Carolina DNR, and South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council.

The Mahi Mahi is only one of two fish in its entire family, Coryphaena. This is in contrast to other some other species like Sea Bass that have over 400 species in their family Serranidae, or Tuna that has 51 relatives in its familyScombridae.

Here is a link to a blog with 14 fresh ways to cook Mahi Mahi.

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